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20121207
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winners and losers, determining who gets educator and how they get educated, those forms of capitalism seem to be gaining the upper hand in the global debate and we have to recognize if we don't address the flaws in our own system like the flaws associated with any college or the inability to create jobs for the free rein given to big investors at the expense of everybody else we are going to lose our influence, the model is going to change and we're going to be at a disadvantage. >> host: what is china doing right? >> guest: they are growing fast. by 2030, china is the second-biggest economy in the world right now. we think of it as an exporting economy but their growth has been internal. by 23 which is not that long way although it sounds far away, they will be the world's largest consumer economy. they will be the ones setting the trend in terms of one car is like and what a washing machine is like and what and ipad is like. they are also building more cities than anybody else, going from 75 cities of 1 million people to two 20 cities of 1 million people to almost 20 cities of ten m
that are younger and are energetic and they come from all over the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of my favorite books on the roman republic. how did this village on the tiber grow to be the absolute leader of the known world in a few hundred years? it expanded its territory by plunder, by what ever. details. it was not pretty. [laughter] it added people, it kept getting bigger and incorporated the people and to roman citizenship. it became very consolidated, expanding group of energetic people. and they'll work. they were not just a bunch of talkers, they were doing. -- there were doers. -- they were doers. we have to consolidate on this. we have to find the common path that will enable us to make the investments and undergo the sacrifice that is required because it is not all ice cream and cake here. you have to curtail consumption. whether it is a business or household. in terms of -- the free sector. it is still the same game.
graduate from our university. why should we educate some of the best minds on earth and say sorry, no room in the u.s. economy for you? it makes no sense. they go away and compete against us rather than innovating and creating jobs here. then i took a closer look at what the republicans are actually proposing. they haven't turned the corner at all. in fact, they haven't even stepped out of their houses. they certainly didn't learn anything from the last election. the stem visa bill on the house floor this week was actually voted down in september. it was introduced with a few changes and no consultation with democrats. i want to find a bipartisan solution on immigration. i'm committed to it. i know it won't be easy. they say a journey of 1,000 miles begins with just one step. the problem is my colleagues on the other side of the aisle want to take one step and have the democrats travel the other 999.9 miles. certainly this bill isn't even a step it's a shell game. it's the same problem that the stem bill in september had. it holds visa from a legal immigration program that works over to a
. it is useful for us to be as relentlessly pro-business as we can. we're very focused on education and we want to be the no. 1 state for solving this riddle that this country has become from being the no. 1 public education nation to one in the bottom half. we know the things -- at risk kids are coming from difficult neighborhoods and often broken families, they need a longer school day. that is nothing new there. there's another way to do that without spending a bunch of money. you can get your teachers union to agree to stagger the school day. some teachers come in early and you have study hall, some come in later and you have sports after school. there is a bunch of ways to address education. great teachers more than parent involvement or anything, you put a great teacher in front of a kid, they work miracles. i think our goal is to say that we're going to fix education. we're working statewide to begin to implement. we do not want them filling out multiple choice tests but you have to measure the effectiveness of a teacher. our goal is sitting down with the union and having them at the tab
college education of i appeared in public with any group of african-americans. that was coercive pressure. it was definitely emotional blackmail and extremely unpleasant. where should government and law stepping? certainly it should step in where physical and/or sexual abuse is going on which is very often. then it is much tougher to talk about emotional coercion and i actually think as bad as my father's practices where it would not have been right for government to remove custody or do something else like that where religious mandate are concerned, intervention would be justified where the behavior either constitutes gross risk to bodily health and safety, witness children being forgiven to have a life-saving blood transfusion or impairs some major bodily function in. i think female genital mutilation practiced on myers should be illegal if it impair sexual pleasure or other bodily functions. the symbolic kirkwood be a different story. christian science believe children should not be taken to the doctor when they are ill, has also been litigated successfully. some forms of so-called alt
with one purpose in mind -- to educate citizens, community groups and policymakers about the positive impacts of choosing locally owned businesses. it is a network of locally owned independent businesses, community organizations and citizens that's grown to more than 3,000 local business owners. studies have shown that shifting just a small percentage of our shopping dollars to locally owned businesses could keep millions in our communities. this is something to think about as the holiday season approaches. instead of going to a chain, why not branch out and get your coffee at safari cafe on south port or get a hotdog at jean and june's and buy a few holiday gift at a local shop as well? local businesses help thriving communities. i'm glad to have local first chicago fighting for ours. thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan is rec
education, keep in mind, not everybody wants to stay here as attractive as our country is, some people want to learn here and go back to other countries thansd fine as well. but many will want to stay here. in losing some of those visas, again, we are only increasing the immigration problem, the legal immigration problem and moving in the opposite direction addressing immigration in this country. there is little to be proud of with regard to the current state of affairs in immigration. it's very different than when my grandparents came here and came to ellis island and albeit with a misspelled name were able to go to work the next day. it's becoming harder and harter. the absence of a legal way of immigrants that's in touch with our labor market in this country, the lack of having an ore rahtive immigration system, has led to 10 million people being here illegally, working here illegally, in many cases integrated into our communities, many of them have american children. yet without any way, currently, of getting right with the law. what we need to do in immigration reform is require that p
want our taxes to go to serve the policies of the country, education, charity, health care. i think that president obama's right about this. but i think compromise is going to be necessary to achieve some result. >> let me bring in abbe. your father is known as a moderate republican and a good dealmaker, a man who used to negotiate. what do you make of this? and what does he make of this? >> i think morale is so low right now. the country's so divided. especially for my generation. we're the ones that are going to be handed down the $60 trillion deficit. they will come to a deal. but right now, it's political theater. and it's probably going to look like the simpson-bowles. that will come full-circle again. >> here's a problem the republicans have got themselves into. is obama has been very clever here, the president. i think what he's done is skillfully said to the public, if he goes over the fiscal cliff, the republicans are prepared to make the entire middle class to pay more tax to save 2% of the wealthiest americans paying a little bit more. and that's a very bad position for t
and the education and health care but once again this is the number one driver of economic growth. liz: of all the funding might get cut if we go over the fiscal cliff, doesn't that create a massive stumbling block for you guys, what you're trying to do? >> there are two areas you are raising. it will be shifting asia. china is not cutting their commitments, they are increasing their commitments and india is dramatically increasing, singapore is dramatically -- the uk is investing more. we are talking about where is the center of innovation, where will the company's -- it is not that it is not going to exist but it will shift -- liz: we will lose our leadership. >> we will lose our leadership of we don't recommit. liz: are you worried we are not turning out enough doctors and scientists in this nation? >> we are probably not turning out enough research scientists with clinical expertise and i am afraid some young people who are interested in this, do i want to take on all those risks, people struggling to keep laboratories going and maybe decide to do something else. the most important resourc
. i'm not here to make friends. my job is not just to teach and entertain, but to educate. so call me. all right let's be honest. if you are like me, and you are thinking this whole kit and caboodle, it is getting real on exhausting. it's getting real on the market. one, it's very hard to pry off. and today's blah action again. nasdaq giving up 1.87%. fortunately we'll hear from a real banker. later in the show. heard about a weakened consumers today from not only than darden. a particular favorite to the "mad money" stf. stock pummeled and finished down. a stable operation. it yields an astounding 4.22%. scoop it up. but, may not be the protection. it doubles the tax on dividends. can't be in there saying -- darden. one of the biggest retail juggernauts. the gap. sales have become sloppy to surrender $3.57 or 10%. although that doesn't spell the death of retailers, we go off the charts tonight. sectors are really doing -- how are they doing? we just witnessed -- relentless pressure in the oil sector. the department doesn't believe going over the cliff will stifle energy command. toda
cannot go to school. i think malala will become the symbol of a girl's rights to education. >> well said. i couple of contemporary issues, one here and one back in our homeland. first one is the fiscal cliff. you're one of the keener economic minds in great britain. what do you make of what's happening in america? the old expression if america sneezes, we all catch a cold back in europe, as true as ever. what do you think should be happening here to try and get a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff happening? >> i have no doubt people are working very hard to get a deal. i wish their discussions -- well, now we have the president re-elected and we have a new congress. i think it's right they get them to the business of sorting this out. i think america's got to think that what it needs to do is get growth in its economy as well. and it needs to get growth by trade and exporting. i think what we're missing at the moment is a global agreement whereby big powers try to rebuild confidence in the world. yes, have you to sort out the fiscal problems. yes, you also have to have growth because that's
'm not here to make friends. my job is not just to teach and entertain, but to educate. so call me. all right let's be honest. if you are like me, and you are thinking this whole kit and caboodle, it is getting real on the market. it is very hard to pry off. hence today's action again. the dow is down. nasdaq giving up and paint drying. and we are go to hear from a banker later on in the show. we heard about a weakening consumer today from the owner of darden. which happens to be part of the "mad money" staff. finished down 8.9%. it yields 42%. but, that yield might not be the protection it used to be. that more than doubles the tax on dividends. we saw one of the biggest retail jugger nauts, the gap. sales have become sloppy to surrender $3.57 or 10%. although that doesn't spell the death of retailers, we go off the charts tonight. and we witnessed downward pressure in the oil sector. today is the first day when the group got any lift at all. so what do we do? is it game over for equities should i go home? no, no, no. let me first say absolutely not. we have to get either to a cliff resoluti
. federal education officials announced today that five states will participate in an experiment to make students spend more time in school. meanwhile, many states are already implementing a new national approach, called the "common core state standards." special correspondent elizabeth brackett of public television station wttw reports on how that's working out in chicago. reporter: chicago elementary school students have walked these stairs for more than 100 years. named for the meat-packing tycoon this chicago public school is now 87% hispanic. like many inner-city schools it is on academic probation. >> you're going to write the main idea of the story on one post-it note. then you're going to rip off another. you're just going to write two character traits. >> reporter: but now this school is on the cutting edge of the biggest change in american education in years. it is one of a small group of chicago schools that is testing the new common course state standards. so far 46 states have adopted the standards which describe what every student needs to know from kindergarten through 12t
education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighborhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbor? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ (laughing) - hi, neighbor! we are in the vegetable garden at school. - hello, neighbor. come on, daniel, let's go pick some veggies! - vegetables! have you ever picked vegetables? i haven't. so i'm excited. here i come! look at our garden! what vegetables
we need an education program by learned scholars, such as those in this audience to help us in getting this word out to america. i think it is essential because it is coming on very fast. there are things that are happening that we take for granted. as an example, we take for granted the fact that we can move thousands and thousands of marines, sailors, soldiers and have the equipment without any burden to carry economy, not true. the truth of the matter is is a tremendous burden to our economy to have a national- security policy that defends the country that we love so much. without having the ability and willingness to get out and give the american public forums such as this in helping giving us answers to some of the very difficult questions that they ask, i want to take this opportunity to think robby for what he does. -- thanks robbie for what he does. i met him some years ago when he found my office in an office building. he came in and we had a chat and i said, my goodness, this fellow knows what he is talking about and he has never disappointed me whatsoever. what we
that work. but ultimately it is about providing greater opportunity, greater education, greater economics, the jobs and growth to a population so that they can have a real stake in their society and can be partners with their government. i assume part of your question is aimed at the whole legalization issue. i think this is an ongoing debate. we are formulating our own response to the votes of two of our states, as you know, and what that means for the federal system, the federal laws and law enforcement. i respect those in the region who believe strongly that that would end the problem. i am not convinced of that, just speaking personally. i think, when you have a ruthless and vicious people who have made money one way and are somehow blocked, they will figure out another way. they will do kidnapping. they will do extortion. there will suborn officials and takeover swaths of territory that they will govern and terrorize people in. so i don't think that is the answer. whether there is some movement that can be discussed, i think it will have to be a topic for the future for us. >> thank
, fundamental rights of parents to direct the education and the upbringing of their child with h special needs. this could result in forcibly transferring a disabled child from the home to government-run schools if these unelected, unaccountable bureaucrats deem it necessary, even if the senate puts reservations into this treaty." i ask that this letter -- i have two letters i'd ask that would be made a part of the record at this point. that is one of the other once coming from the concerned women of america. i ask that they be made a part of the record at this point in the journal. ferraro ithe presiding officer:s there objection? without objection. mr. inhofe: i have been an advocate of human rights around the world, ensuring that the world is accessible to those with disabilities. however, i do not support the cumbersome regulations and potentially overzealous international organizations with anti-american biases that inch - that infringe upon american society. you know, if we had not passed what i consider to be the gold standard of the disabled world when we passed -- and i do remember at
research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. secondhand smoke affects everyone's health. it's not just irritating. it can cause heart disease and even death. speak up about secondhand smoke. your health and the health of your family depend on it. [ticking] >> the 20-year-old steve jobs returned to northern california after trekking through india for several months in 1974. with his friend steve wozniak, he started building and peddling a primitive computer for hobbyists. in 1976, with a $1,300 investment, they founded apple computer in his parents' garage. >> explain to me how somebody who was a hippie, a college dropout, somebody who drops l.s.d. and marijuana goes off to india and comes back deciding he wants to be a businessman. >> jobs has within him sort of this conflict, but he doesn't quite see it as a conflict, between being hippie-ish and antimaterialistic but wanting to sell things like wozniak's board, wanting to crea
at the institute. and now i run my own educational thing called liberty classroom.com. now that we're living in the information revolution, it's a revolution that makes ambiguitien berg look like a bum. i teach u.s. history to anybody who is interested in learning about it through the site. i keep busy. >> you live in kansas. >> yes. we have to me on for another show about the backdrop to that. yes, indeed. >> is ited a venn teenage use in your view to live outside some of the major cities of the u.s.? >> it could be. i mean, obviously there are pros and cons. we miss living near new york city. obviously we had a severe crisis, which i hope we don't. i'm not sure that large population centers where somebody would want to be. obviously it would be unthinkable should happen. it's not why we moved, if there were a really bad attack of one type of another, we don't live in a concentrated area. there are advantages. >> we have been talking with thomas woods junior. the most recent book "rollback: repealing big government before the coming fiscal collapse." this is booktv on c-span2 on locations i
the american people to go along with and probably needs to be more of an education process to say look at the numbers, here are the numbers. we haven't heard that. >> i think that's right. remember, we do elect representatives of the people. they should understand it. when you are running at a trillion dollar plus deficit every year and have $16 trillion worth of debt, it is 100% of gdp, that's a signal we have to do something. so i wouldn't expect all the american people that haven't had much exposure to this stuff to be fully cognizant. i hope the representatives are. >> but do you have people that say there is not a problem here. some -- like paul krugman who is a nobel prize-winning economist knows more than people on the street were doing this, he says you shouldn't be doing this at this point. >> i think that paul krugman is -- remarkable record of being wrong a lot of times. and -- i know that he has been -- nobel laureate and i won't be. but i think there's -- any serious person recognizes there is a problem here and we have to do something about it. >> how come we are still no
, seriously. parents stampeding all in the name of education here. they raced to sign their children up at an engineering school in the carolinas the only one with an engineering curriculum. a mother went to the hospital after the stampede. parents camped out to keep the spots. they didn't run they were already outside. >> camping out can you imagine? >> crazy. >> wow. >>> 6:53 right now. a big surprise for san jose police how a burglary call turned into a major pot bust. ,, well, well, well. growing up, we didn't have u-verse. we couldn't record four shows at the same time. in my day, you were lucky if you could record two shows. and if mom was recording her dumb show and dad was recording his dumb show then, by george, that's all we watched. and we liked it! today's kids got it so good. [ male announcer ] get u-verse tv with a total home dvr included free for life. only $29 a month for six months. rethink possible. only $29 a month for six months. [ traffic passing ] ] ♪ [ music box: lullaby ] [ man on tv, indistinct ] ♪ [ lullaby continues ] [ baby coos ] [ man announ
into education, into science, into infrastructure as well and he'll be talking about the infrastructure initiatives including more must be for small to medium size businesses, more money for power stations as well. but it really looks like he's got very little room for maneuver. the opposition, he'll get that and say this is your fault, these are your policies. mr. osbourne will turn around and say look what's turning around you. look what's going on in the financial sector. look what's going on in the eurozone as well where unemployment is actually on the surface much worse than it is in the united kingdom. so it's going to be the usual ding dong battle of theatre. but i doubt we'll see many new initiatives that haven't been leaked already, ross. >> yeah, you only have to read the papers today and everything seems to be in there. i think you've done a very good two and a half-minute analysis of everything we might get. well-done. we'll come back to you later. get a cup of coffee, stay warm. julian joins us with his own thoughts. steve got into all the details. he's laid it all out for
no leadership capable of making a deal. you cannot start with the education of little kids, teaching them to hate israel and everything that it stands for, and hope to have support from the people when you make a deal like that. there are a lot of conditions for this to work. it cannot happen overnight. as i said, part of the problem is that have created their own problem for acceptance of any kind of a reasonable deal. >> express some realism about what is likely to happen in afghanistan after the departure of substantial numbers of u.s. troops. we'll be back essentially to where it was before 9/11. what happens to pakistan after that? it is semi-democratic. >> this just adds to the conundrum of the entire area and how we deal with it. i go back to where i started. if you have some first principles that you try to apply in any controversy and recognize that as to apply them, there will be certain -- circumstances were some send potential compromise is required, the new approach of these problems that way. if you have very good intelligence, you understand better what is going on within t
people without disabilities. across the world, people with disabilities have for help, lower educational achievement, less economic participation, and higher rates of poverty and people without disabilities. this unacceptable situation must change. >> california has formalized its refusal to ensure the enforcement of federal effort begin immigration requests. on tuesday, attorney general kamala harris said state agencies are not required to -- comply with the program known as secure communities, where local authorities share fingerprints with immigration officials. the program led to the record deportation of around 400,000 people last year. striking care for workers at the port of los angeles and long beach have reached a tentative agreement after an eight-day walkout. workers went on strike last week against international corporations who they say are outsourcing good paying jobs. the strike cost southern california a reported $8 billion in lost economic activity and marked the worst disruption of local cargo traffic in a decade. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and pe
of the resources to solve the problem. i think we need an education program by learned united state, such as those in this audience to help us in getting this word out to america. i think it is essential because it is coming on very fast. there are things that are happening that we take for granted. as an example, we take for granted the fact that we can move thousands and thousands of marines, sailors, soldiers and have the equipment without any burden to carry economy, not true. the truth of the matter is is a tremendous burden to our economy to have a national- security policy that defends the country that we love so much. without having the ability and willingness to get out and give the american public forums such as this in helping giving us answers to some of the very difficult questions that they ask, i want to take this opportunity to think robby for what he does. i met him some years ago when he found my office in an office building. he came in and we had a chat and i said, my goodness, this fellow knows what he is talking about and he has never disappointed me whatsoever. what we need t
was involved in. >> absolutely. >> even dealing with kids and health and education and all the things. what really inspired her? what drove her? >> it is a remarkable -- 100 organizations. they say countless thousands of individuals that she helped along the way either through those groups or individually dispensing advice, money, you know, helping people out. the work she did with the hospitals was huge. the children's hospital in melbourne, a research center as well. i think it gives the answer to your question was she said when she was 99 she said looking out for people is the most important thing in life and is the most rewarding. happiness, i think, lies in thought for other people and trying to help them. i mean, whenever you think of rupert murdock or whatever else, this was a lovely lady. >> what does she think of her son's endeavors in the media and all the controversy around the empire? >> she was proud of all her kids. i actually knew rupert murdock's daughter, elizabeth, who was named after dame elizabeth too, and she used to speak fondly of her grandmother. this was 20 years ag
in education, et cetera. i'm joined by gloria borger now. >> how about that et cetera? >> you like the et cetera. they got two very different proposals on the table right now. >> they're speaking past each other. they seem to be really living in different universes or one on mars, one on venus, whatever you want to call it. look, it's very clear. one of the republicans want more entitlement cuts up front. and the democrats want these tax increases on the wealthy up front. the irony here to me watching this is in the long term, the second part of this, everybody seems to know what needs to be done. they know you've got to fix entitlement spending. they know you've got to reform the tax code to make it simpler and to make it fairer. the big problem they've got is how you get from here to there. and right now, in order to get over this hump, they sort of are in the position of putting everything out there on the table and so we now know what the base of each party wants and would applaud. and now they've got to go behind closed doors and figure how they get past january and how they avoid th
exaggerated at least i think his father behaved disgracefully. he had an expensive oxford education but purposefully denied it to young winston. >> purposefully, for what reason. >> partly money. he was very conscious of the expense of sending winston to oxford. he suggested that the army was a more suitable career and then tried to bargain with him not to go to the cavalry, that might be too expensive there. that wasn't all together an easy relationship. >> but he sold to to winston churchill by saying you can be a great man of the army. >> he did. he tried to. >> he later discovered that he really was too stupid to go to the bar. he was very disappointed, that he thought his father thought he was, you know, was going to be successing -- --. >> rose: found out his father thought he was too stupid. >> his father was dismissive. >> horrid to him. >> winston always wanted his father's affection. even a poignant story late in his life after the second world war where he had had all these accomplishments where winston has this supposedly dream moment where his father comes back and wins
the availability of the resources to solve that problem. i think we need an education program by learned scholars to help us getting this word out to america. i think that is essential, because it's coming on very, very fast. there are things that are happening we take for granted. as an example, we take for granted the fact that we can move thousands and thousands of marines and sailors and soldiers and their equipment overseas without any burden to our economy. not true. the truth of the matter is it's a tremendous burden to our economy to have a national security policy that defends the country that we love so much. so i think without having the ability and the willingness to get out and give the american public forums such as this, and you're there to help us in giving the americans the answers to some of the very difficult and very cogent questions which they ask. i want to take this opportunity to thank robby for what he does . i met robby some years ago when he found my bottom office in an office building and came in, and we had a chat and i said, my goodness, this fellow knows what he's t
at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >> after steve jobs died in 2011, there was an outpouring of gratitude from his fans for the way his inventions changed their lives. among the most passionate are parents of children with severe forms of autism, especially those who can't speak and appear hopelessly locked inside themselves. those parents often say these kids understand more and know more than they're able to communicate. well, now with the help of the ipad and other tablet computers, some of those parents are finding out they were right. as lesley stahl first reported in october 2011, it turns out that with specially designed applications, or apps, these computers are helping to unlock the isolation of people like joshua hood. >> imagine spending your life having conversations like this. "p." "l." having to poke out words on a laminated piece of paper one letter at time. "c," plastic. it was so frustrating for josh, his mother, nancy, says he would often give up and retreat int
to keep going forward to look to the future as an army. one of those is just as such a super educated, well trained, junior later echelon now that is capable of doing so much more. we can't lose that. so we have to educate them on how to deploy that. the provincial reconstruction team, the usaid, ngos, they ngos, they're working the same battle states, operational lines that we are with the afghan national cicada force. so you have to train your task force to kind of shift your force. human and physical geography and all the baggage that comes with it. and so that was, that was a necessary step we had to take the and every battalion like mine or brigade is doing the same thing. there's a lot of differences between iraq and afghanistan. i was fortunate to have served in both countries and go back to afghanistan against on your a little bit. you asked the question what is no slack. again, that ethos describes whose those soldiers are and to embrace that mission, understands what has to happen, and knowing they're going to try to do some good. talk about at a lot of iraq veterans, people
constituents or colleagues, he striving strio educate with facts, weaved, andh facts, with evidence, and with the truth. none of us has ever heard jon try to win an argument by belittling or berating an opponent. it is simply not in his characteristic to do so. mr. president, it has been said that a politician thinks of the next election a statesman of the next generation. this statesman of arizona expresses his philosophy of government and the obligation of government leaders this way: quote "we owe future generations the chance to live their dreams, to be successful, and, most important, to achieve true happiness by their own efforts." end quote. senator jon kyl's commitment to the security of our nation, to fiscal responsibility, and to helping those in need have earned him a reputation that is worthy of his characteristic. the people of arizona and america are grateful for his service, and i am thankful for his guidance over the years and for his friendship. we wish him all the best to come in the years before him. mr. president, there is one more tribute that i'd like to give t
advantage of their well educated labor forces and their potential in terms of innovation and global reach. they could greatly benefit first maintaining a growth friendly business environment, and they could greatly benefit from reinventing their production structure, upgrading quality, and redistricting their exports towards strongly growing markets. innovation is crucial in this respect. this means for a start that where profit margins are restored, they should serve to fund research and development to higher extent. but innovation potential is not always translated into actual marketable employment creating and growth sustaining innovation. what is key in translating potential is the regime of economic incentives. and it is indeed this system of economic incentives that the current waiver of structural reforms in the euro area is addressing. central challenge is to set conditions so that the skills of the labor force especially of our young people can be profitably employed in competitive firms or in the new enterprises that will go on to set up. in this vain, removing rigidity clearly
to state coffers. while most think lotteries fund education, 12 of 44 states use the money solely for that. back in tallahassee, the machines that hold our fate were locked up in a vault. as the sun set on the luckiest place in texas they kept coming. right up until sales stopped just an hour before the big drawing. >> take a look at tonight's numbers. >> reporter: when so many dreams were put to bed. i'm ryan owens in texas. >>> well, for the first time we are hearing from general david petraeus himself about his affair with paula broadwell. petraeus says his wife holly has not kicked him out despite the enormous difficulty he created for her by having the affair. he says resignation of head of the cia was the right thing to do. >> nice save. >>> another key republican lawmaker is challenging the possible nomination of susan rice as the next secretary of state. senator susan collins of maine emerged from a 90-minute closed door meeting with the ambassador voicing some new criticism of her initial account about libya. secretary of state clinton and president obama meanwhile are continuing
in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. i heard you guys can ship ground for less than the ups store. that's right. i've learned the only way to get a holiday deal is to camp out. you know we've been open all night. is this a trick to get my spot? [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. save on ground shipping at fedex office. >>> it is interesting to zero how -- the guidance is below street consensus and looks immediately through it because they think you are sandbagging that guidance. so walk us through the deceleration in same store sales growth. why are you giving this forecast? is it capacity issues? what is behind the slowdown? >> i don't think it's really capacity issues for us at all. i think we have great product in the store right now. we definitely lost some momentum in the middle, or the beginning of the quarter in november. where we had some technical issues with our product notifications, which we send out to guests, so we weren't driving traffic to our stores
future. ♪ our weapons are testing... education, care and support. ♪ and aids... ♪ aids is going to lose. aids is going to lose. ♪ in that time there've been some good days. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ with odor free aspercreme. powerful medicine relieves pain fast, with no odor. so all you notice is relief. aspercreme. >>> supporters and opponents of same sex marriage are anxiously watching the supreme court this afternoon and the same month that voters in three states approved gay marriage, the justices are meeting to decide whether to take on the issue. they're looking at several cases. our justice correspondent joe johns is here to help us go through the big ones now. so, joe, let's start with the prop 8 issue, proposition 8, which outlaws gay marriage in california. what happens if the court decides not to hear this one?
beencountry with limited resources, --girls do not get an education. you can see the women are doing they are in their 30's or '40's protect these women are elite beaters. bring the work back to katmandu. . and they wanted me to wish you ec's and greetings. >>host: they blast that jewelry, the blast osprey it is a true sisterhood. >>host: it is not a charity case we love this jewelry. the red this final call, the blue. there is a lot of beaded jewelry out there this is not what you find for $50 per and the bead work looks like juleswels it is not just one shade of blue. back at >>guest: therefore shades of each of the colors you have your silver gold beads. you're really going to sparkle. you want to piece of jewelry that price is important you can deny that. when your needs are taking care of, take some pleasure in knowing you are supporting the traditional beaders. for the first time in their life they have financial freedom. >>host: for many years you could not get jewelry at of this part of the world. >>host: is the most beautiful rich plumber. it looks like diamonds are
more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use. it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. >>> house republican leaders making a counteroffer that was rejected by the white house yesterday. the proposal calls for $800 billion in increased tax revenue over the next decade which is half of what the president proposed in his plan. it does not include higher tax rates for the wealthy which is the central issue dividing the parties. we're joined by majority whip kevin mccarthy joining us from the hill. good to have you. good morning. >> thanks for having me. >> a lot has been made over whether or not you're trying to sell this as a bowles endorsed plan. are you? >> we're not trying to sell bowles but he talked about this frame work before the super
in education, including investment in infrastructure, including investment in innovation to grow our economy which in turn will help our deficit situation as the economy grows. without raising any taxes. but the fact of the matter is i know the gentleman has historically not felt tax cuts should be paid for either by reducing it or offsetting. the president doesn't agree with the $800 billion because he doesn't think the math works. i share the president's view. the math doesn't work. the most useful effort will be if we all agree on the onive -- objective, whether it's $4 trillion, whether it's 70% debt to g.d.p. ratio which most economists or a little less than that is sustainable or is on a sustainable path. if we all agree with the objective and then, mr. majority leader, simply make the math work to get there on a way that we could agree on, i think america would be advantaged, the economy would be advantaged and we'd see a renaissance of job creation in this country as we did in the 2000's. and i'll be glad to yield to my friend. mr. cantor: i accept the gentleman's good intentions. i
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